Rich Kids Pushing Masses Out of Yale

Flood of Foreign Silver Spoons is Unintended Consequence of Globalism

0
440

Asian Americans are suing Yale University for allegedly discriminating against them, even though more of them are attending the elite school than ever before.

The Asian American share of freshmen slots at Yale has grown from 14 percent to 21.7 percent over the past 15 years. Even though they’re allegedly being held to higher entrance standards.

So, what’s the problem?

The underlying problem isn’t really about race, it’s about wealth and greed.

The painful truth is that Yale and its fellow Ivy League schools aren’t discriminating against Asian Americans so much as they’re discriminating against all of America’s poor and middle class. The treasonous sonsabitches running these American institutions very much prefer educating rich foreign students to the children of their fellow American workers.

This marginalization of the masses is one of the unintended consequences of globalism, class warfare and “profits over people.” 

It’s visible at Ivy League schools because there are simply way too many rich kids buying their way into them. Especially from China and India.

Every one of them displaces a deserving poor or middle class American student who might otherwise have made it in on brains and hard work alone. Thereby limiting American social mobility.

This was a problem before the rise of the global economy in 1994, which has risen to crisis levels.

China and India have a combined population of 3 billion which is roughly 10 times the U.S. population of 327 million. That’s 10 times as many rich kids and geniuses, all trying to get into the Ivies just as the schools are transforming their reputation for American exceptionalism into a brand for global exceptionalism.

Who loses?

 

America. Specifically, poor and middle class American kids who are straight-A students, but not geniuses. Especially Asian-American kids.

Who wins?

Rich sonsabitches.

The 427,000 foreign undergraduate students now in the U.S. is 79 percent more than a decade ago, according to the Institute of International Education. The top supplier is China, followed by Saudi Arabia, South Korea, India and Vietnam.

The influx of well heeled foreigners underpins higher domestic tuition costs, by artificially boosting demand, at a time when only 60 percent of Americans over the age of 16 have full-time employment, 50 million Americans are living in  poverty, and the middle class is dying.

Getting junior into an Ivy League school and securing American citizenship are huge status symbols for the nouveau riche of China and India, who are willing to pay top dollar to make it happen. Even when doing so means displacing a deserving American kid of humble origins to make way for a Fuerdai, one of the obnoxious Chinese rich kids who love to push their parent’s wealth in everyone’s face

The special treatment the scions of these emerging nations want has always been part of the Ivy League. Colleges like Yale routinely set aside legacy slots for dumb rich kids whose parents graduated from them, and for anyone else willing to pony up big donations for the university endowment fund.

Case in point, President Donald Trump and former President George W. Bush.

Trump’s marketing professor at Wharton School of Business and Finance, William T. Kelley, repeatedly stated that the trust fund baby was the dumbest student he ever had.  Bush was also an indifferent student.

It didn’t stop them from receiving every possible opportunity in life, and it won’t stop their rich kids from being held to lesser standards.

Federal data shows that the freshman classes of the eight Ivy league schools grew by 5 percent from 2004 to 2014, while the number of incoming foreign students rose 46 percent, according to The Washington Post. Every seat the rich kids take is a seat some middle class or poor kid who isn’t a genius doesn’t get.

It’s a demographic problem. Not an issue of racial discrimination.

Think about it. If you’re Yale, are you going to say “no” to some rich Chinese kid whose daddy wants to give you a $1 million donation?

Hell no.

You’re not even going to say “no” to the 500th rich Chinese kid whose daddy wants to buy their way into your school.

However, that flood of big money also creates unintended consequences. Namely, an overwhelmingly Asian student body in a country where Asians are just 5.6 percent of the national population. Compared with 60 percent globally.

How do you conceal that fact from Americans who also want to send their kids to Yale? 

You do it by limiting the number of deserving Asian American students from poor and middle class families. Hence the lawsuit.

So what happens if the plaintiffs win?

Two things. First, America’s best colleges will have to think twice about being rich enclaves again. And second, Yale is going to become an overwhelmingly Asian school.

How’s that for destroying diversity through diversity in the misguided belief that Asians are a global minority just because they’re a minority here in the U.S.?

The driving force behind all this nonsense is America’s transformation into the preferred destination for much of the world’s rich. Especially those from emerging nations like Brazil and Nigeria. They want to live here, because it’s nice to be rich in America.

However, they take away opportunities which are meant for our own poor and middle class .

Like the opportunity to attend Yale if you’re just really smart, but not a genius. And the black scholarships which are meant for the descendants of American slaves. Rather than the pampered children of Nigerian oil executives.

America’s obsession with the world’s rich comes at the expense of its own masses, who are increasingly being subject to taxation without representation as the lobbyists magnify the political influence of the Predatory 1 Percent.

Class warfare is making poor and middle class Americans the equivalent of stateless people in their own homeland.

America is a democratic nation, not a country club for the world’s rich, and our people should come ahead of rich foreigners. The fact that they don’t is a reflection of the degree to which the rich have subverted the will of the electorate.

The proper term for this practice isn’t “class warfare” or “profits over people.” It’s “high treason.”

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here